Read Posters

Scroll to browse the library's READ posters, or click on the name of the person whose poster you would like to see.

Rafael Alvarado Theresa Arndt Christine Bombaro Amelia Brunskill
Brock Clarke Kirk Doran William G. Durden James Fein
Jim Gerencser Jerome Igle Eleanor Mitchell John M. Osborne
Michael Pennington Sister Helen Prejean Benjamin Rush Ann Margaret Thompson
Malinda Triller Mark Wardecker Yunshan Ye Alex Zobel

                        Alex Zobel '08

                              READS

              The Yiddish Policemen's Union
                      by Michael Chabon

We asked: Why is this book special or important to you?

Alex responded: "To be honest, I chose The Yiddish Policemen's Union over any other Michael Chabon book because his name appears largest on the cover of this book and that's what I want students to see.

It does not matter which of his titles students pick up, as long as they read something by Michael Chabon. Just when I think that my love affair with letter has come to an anti-climatic end, Chabon comes out with something that renews my faith in storytelling. He is almost single-handedly keeping the lexical wealth that is the English language a currency worth using, and you will be a better person if you read him with a dictionary.

More broadly, Chabon is crusading to keep exciting genres from being marginalized by so-called "literary" fiction with its quiet epiphanies and obsessive navel-gazing. Michael Chabon is fighting the good fight and restoring the plot to contemporary American fiction. And I love him."

Photo by Libby Parks
Created: Spring 2008

Jerome Igle '08

READS

Reflecting black:
African-American
 cultural criticism
   by Michael Eric Dyson


We asked: Why is this book special or important to you?
Jerome responded:
"This book is very insightful and thought provoking. It challenges you to reconsider the way you look at race, class, gender and religion, which you see as the dominant themes in today's political discussion. Its impact has forced me to have this dialog inside and outside classrooms."



Photo by Pierce Bounds
Created: Spring 2008

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                       Brock Clarke '90

                                READS

                        his newest novel:
        An Arsonist's Guide to Writers' Homes
                           in New England















Photo by Pierce Bounds
Created: Spring 2008


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Sister Helen Prejean

Sister Helen Prejean, C.S.J.

Author of

Dead Man Walking
&
The Death of Innocents

READS
(and Writes!)

Sister Helen Prejean, C.S.J. visited Dickinson College in October 2007 to discuss the death penalty and her work with indigent death-row inmates.

 

 

Photo by: A. Pierce Bounds
Art Direction: Christine Bombaro & Ryan Burke
Created: Fall 2007

 

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Bill Durden READ

William G. Durden

President & Class of 1971

READS

The Autobiography of Benjamin Rush

President Durden writes: "I chose Dr. Rush's autobiography because I wanted to confirm some points and maybe learn something new directly from him."

 

 




Photo by: A. Pierce Bounds
Art Direction: Ryan Burke & Christine Bombaro
Created: Summer 2007

 

 

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Librarians READDickinson College Librarians

READ

To find out why we love these books, read our statements.


Top to Bottom:
Malinda Triller (The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver)
Amelia Brunskill (Smilla's Sense of Snow by Peter Hoeg)
Yunshan Ye
(Chinese Avant-Garde Photography Since 1990, edited by Zhu Qi)
Mark Wardecker (The Complete Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle)
James Fein (New Seeds of Contemplation by Thomas  Merton)
Kirk Doran (French Piano Music: An Anthology, edited by Isidor Philipp)
Eleanor Mitchell (The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton)
Theresa Arndt
(Diet for a Small Planet by Frances Moore Lappé)
Ann Margaret Thompson (The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd
Chris Bombaro (The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien)
Jim Gerencser (The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas)


Photo by: A. Pierce Bounds
Art Direction: Ryan Burke
Created: Spring 2007

 

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Rafael Alvarado READS

Rafael Alvarado
with his son, Healy

READS

Harry Potter and the Sorceror's Stone
by J.K. Rowling

Dr. Alvarado writes: "Conventional wisdom says that our children are post-literate digital natives, but I think the Harry Potter phenomenon shows otherwise. My daughter began the series in first grade and read each volume faithfully, doing a good imitation of her mother’s ability to read a book for 6 hours on end. Skeptical at first, I began reading HP myself to learn what was going on in my daughter’s head.  It was a pleasant surprise and I have been an avid follower of the series myself.  My son has other literary interests (of the “graphic novel” variety) but nothing catches his attention more than having Rowling or Tolkien read to him, without the help of the moving or still image.  It’s a good sign for the long-term viability of both the printed word and narrative itself."

Photo by: A. Pierce Bounds
Art Direction: Ryan Burke & Christine Bombaro
Created: Summer 2007

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Mike PenningtonMichael Pennington

Class of 2007

READS

The Great Gatsby
by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Michael Pennington writes: "After reading the timeless classic, The Great Gatsby in my Honors English class during my senior year in high school, I enrolled in the course entitled Economic Apartheid in America as my Freshman Seminar at Dickinson College. This book challenged me to critically look at social classes within the U.S. and to analyze the huge gap that still exists between the small number of people within the upper strata of wealth, and the large number of Americans that struggle to live one day at a time. In addition to focusing on money, Fitzgerald also focused on the themes of justice, power, greed, and betrayal. All of these themes apply to how one chooses to live his or her own life, irrespective of era, while helping to show the consequences of making the wrong decisions."

Photo by: A. Pierce Bounds
Art Direction: Ryan Burke & Christine Bombaro
Created: Spring 2007

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John Osborne READS

Professor John M. Osborne

with his granddaughter, Olivia Hulstine

READS

One Hungry Monster: A Counting Book in Rhyme
by Susan Heyboer O’Keefe
illustrated by Lynn Munsinger

Professor Osborne writes: “This was an old book on my shelf – I rarely throw out books – that now comes in handy for granddaughter reading.  Monsters, food and numbers – all of the necessary preparations for life…”

 

 

Photo by: Christine Bombaro
Art Direction: Ryan Burke
Created: Winter 2007

 

 

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Last Updated: June 17th, 2008